How Do You Choose Best Sunscreens For Your Child?

Even one blistering sunburn, as an adult, can almost double the risk of a child developing melanoma — the deadliest of skin cancers. Thankfully, by getting serious about sun protection, you will significantly reduce your child’s risk of having harmful skin cancers.

New moms and dads, your baby is still too small to wear sunscreen, so begin by holding your baby in the shade when you go outside. Dress him up in long-sleeved, tightly knit shirts and trousers, and don’t forget a hat with a brim.

It is time to make a habit of sunscreen until your baby reaches 6 months and older. But with so many to choose from on the market, it can be tough to decide which one is best for your children.

What Do You Need To Look For In Sunscreens?

Children need to wear sunscreen but they don’t have to wear a sunscreen for a child. As it turns out, sunscreens advertised as “baby” formulae are no more safe or controlled than other sunscreens. We recommend looking for those words on the front label when shopping for sunscreen:

Broad Spectrum

This ensures that the sunscreen protects the skin from ultraviolet UVA and UVB rays that can also cause cancer.

30 (or more) SPF

SPF stands for “sun protection factor.” SPF 30 means 97 percent of the sun’s rays are covered by sunscreen. Lower SPFs block a little bit more but no sunscreen will block 100%.

Water Resistant, Or Very Resistant To Water

Water-resistant creams prove to be the best moisturizer Suncote Lotion for face and provide security for the number of minutes indicated on the bottle when children are in and out of the water. This does not mean that the product is waterproof-there is no waterproof sunscreen.

Minerals Or Chemicals?

Mineral sunscreens are those which contain the active ingredient zinc oxide or titanium oxide. Some sunscreens rest on top of the skin, deflecting the rays of the sun. Mineral sunscreens can appear on your child’s skin like a white film, even after you rub them in.

Chemical sunscreens work by absorbing the rays of the sun and typically leave no visible film after application.

Lotions Or Sprays?

Although coping with squirmy little ones may be more pleasant, it is best to avoid spraying sunscreens. It’s difficult to judge how much really gets onto the skin so it’s easy to miss a spot. In addition, sprays are easier to breathe in and can irritate the lungs.

If you are choosing a spray, do not spray it around your face or your mouth. Instead, spray it onto your palms, then apply it to areas of your face. Sprays are flammable too, so watch out for open fires, like a barbecue.

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